Monthly Archives: July 2013

Seminar held on “Mobile Apps and Future Business & Career” in Daffodil International University :Dr Syed Md Zainul Abedin

A Seminar was held on “Mobile Apps and Future Business & Career” in Daffodil International University(DIU) on 20 July 2013.The seminar was  jointly organized by CTO Forum Bangladesh and Daffodil International University.

The seminar started at the auditorium of Daffodil International University at 0230pm with the welcome speech of Session Chair,  Professor Dr.M.Lutfor Rahman,Vice Chancellor, Daffodil International University.

A number of colorful  multimedia presentations were done  on various aspects of “Mobile Apps and Future Business & Career” to a large audience of experts,teachers,students and dignitaries.

Dr.Syed Akhtar Hossain, Professor and Head, Department of Computer Science Engineering(CSE) and Mr.Md.Mahmudul Hasan,Senior Lecturer, Department of CSE presented from the Academia.

Mr.Md.Z. H. Lashkar Palash,Chief Technical Officer, D a t a S o f t  S y s t e m s  B D  L i m i t e d and Mr.Lutfor Rahman,Chief Information Officer,Airtel Bangladesh Limited presented from the Industry.

Dr.Ezazul Huq,Tresurer,CTO Forum,Mr.Kanon Kumar Roy,Director General,National Revenue Board and Member CTO Forum and Mr.Taher Ahmed Chowdhury  also a member of CTO Forum spoke on the prospects of Mobile Apps from various angles.

Members of the audience joined discussion after the presentations. It was revealed from the presentations and discussions that  a Mobile Application or Mobile App was a  software application designed to run on smartphones,tablet computers  and other mobile devices. Due to the usability of Mobile Apps their  popularity  has continued to increase. Developing application software for mobile devices emerged as a great opportunity for the trained personnel in this field. The presenters explained how development of mobile apps may be a means of career and business.They demonstrated the lucrative market or business prospects of Mobile Apps.They mentioned that 16 mobile operator companies were functioning in Bangladesh to provide services for the large number of mobile device users. Considering the  utility of various types of Apps students were urged to make best use of the existing and upcoming opportunities.

The seminar was closed by a photo session following  the vote of thanks.

 

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Bangladesh Reduced Number of Poor by 16 million in a Decade

Source: http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2013/06/20/bangladesh-reduced-number-of-poor-by-16-million-in-a-decade

 

 

PRESS RELEASE

Bangladesh Reduced Number of Poor by 16 million in a Decade

June 20, 2013

 

DHAKA, June 20, 2013: Bangladesh has made remarkable progress in reducing poverty from 2000 to 2010. The country witnessed steady and continuous decline in the number of poor people over the decade—from nearly 63 million in 2000 to 47 million in 2010. Despite a growing population, the number of poor people declined by 26 percent in 10 years. Poverty declined by 1.7 percentage points per year. The series of external shocks that affected Bangladesh in 2007 and 2008 did not significantly slow down the speed of poverty reduction.

A new World Bank report ‘Bangladesh Poverty Assessment: Assessing a Decade of Progress in Reducing Poverty, 2000-2010’ launched today says during the period 2000-2010 poverty reduction was closely linked to the growth in labor income and changes in demographics. Labor income, both formal and informal, was the dominant factor in higher incomes and lower poverty rates. Fertility rates have been steadily dropping over the last several decades which have resulted in lower dependency ratios and more income per-capita.  The second half of the 2000s saw an escalation of real rural wages but the growth of urban real wages was lackluster.

Against the odds, Bangladesh lifted 16 million people out of poverty in the last 10 years and also reduced inequality; that is a rare and remarkable achievement.’ said Johannes Zutt, World Bank Country Director for Bangladesh.Bangladesh now needs to help a growing population of young adults to obtain the skills and education needed to find productive work and to participate fully in Bangladesh’s social and political life. The World Bank remains committed to working with the Government to help all Bangladeshis escape poverty and share in the country’s growing prosperity.”

The living conditions of the poor also improved in the first decade of 2000. Between 2000 and 2005, a large number of households saw an improvement in terms of the materials used in the constructions of their homes and access to services. Between 2005 and 2010, while the poor continued to improve the quality of their homes, the largest improvements for all households were in terms of the amenities households owned such as television sets and cellular phones.

While overall improvement in wellbeing can seen across all regions, poverty continues to be a daunting problem with about 47 million people still living in poverty and 26 million people in extreme poverty. Poverty in rural areas continues to be more pervasive and extreme than in urban areas, whereas urban areas remain relatively more unequal.

For sustained poverty reduction, Bangladesh needs coordinated multi-sectoral action. To maintain steady growth in income, it will be necessary to promote investments to raise agricultural productivity and also to promote more jobs in manufacturing and service sector.” said Dean Jolliffe, Senior Economist, World Bank and co-author of the report.

From 2000 to 2005, the East (Chittagong, Dhaka and Sylhet) was rapidly improving, while the West (Barisal, Khulna and Rajshahi) had been lagging behind. The poverty pattern changed in the next five years. Between 2005 and 2010, Western divisions experienced larger reductions in poverty and also managed to reach levels of poverty that are closer to those of their Eastern counterparts.

A growing share of women in the labor force contributed to poverty reduction, but further increasing their participation remains a challenge. The labor force participation rate of women, though increased from 25 percent to about 35 percent over the decade, still remains low by international standards.

Bangladesh spends over 2 percent of its GDP on safety net programs but reaches only a third of the poor. Bangladesh needs to focus on improving the linkage between safety nets and poverty reduction through improved design, targeting and timing of safety net responses. For example, the large number of cash allowances could be linked to human capital formation and targeted to the poor. ” said Iffath Sharif, Senior Economist, World Bank and co-author of the report.

ICDDRB Board of Trustees appoints Dr. Richard Smith as Chair

Board of Trustees appoints Dr. Richard Smith as Chair

 

21 June 2013 – icddr,b is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Richard Smith as the new chair of its board. The appointment was made following the meeting of icddr,b’s board of trustees in Dhaka on 15 and 16 June. Dr. Smith takes over from Dr. Elizabeth Mason who has stepped down due to her on-going commitments at the World Health Organization, but will remain a board member.

“I feel honoured to be associated with icddr,b – it is a remarkable institution.” said Dr. Smith while addressing staff. “iccdr,b has made a major contribution to improving the health of people in Bangladesh and other low income countries, and I’m confident it can do still more.”

Dr. Smith is a medical doctor with a long, distinguished and recognised career in public health and medical publishing. He is best known for his pioneering work at the BMJ (formerly the British Medical Journal) where he served as editor, and as chief executive of the BMJ Publishing Group. In January 2000, he was awarded a CBE (Commander of the British Empire) for his services to medical journalism.

Dr. Smith is currently director of UnitedHealth’s Chronic Disease Initiative, having served as chief executive of UnitedHealth Europe from 2004-2007. Together with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (one of the U.S. National Institutes of Health) the initiative funds 11 centres in low and middle income countries doing research and building capacity on non-communicable disease (NCD).

An alumnus of Edinburgh University, Dr. Smith is an honorary fellow of several distinguished colleges, including the Academy of Medical Sciences, the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, the Royal College of Physicians of London, the Faculty of Public Health Medicine, the Royal College of General Practitioners, the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Kasturba Medical College, Karnataka, India. He is an adjunct professor at Imperial College Institute for Global Health Innovation and a  professor at the University of Warwick.

Dr. Smith has considerable experience of boards having served on many, including those of the Public Library of Science, St George’s, University of London, and the United Kingdom Research Integrity Office. He is currently chair of Patients Know Best, a company that provides patient controlled records, and the Cochrane Library Oversight Committee.

Dr. Smith has served  as a member of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and is a founder member of both the World Association of Medical Journal Editors and the Committee on Publication Ethics.

Over the past 30 years Dr. Smith has lectured and led seminars and workshops around the globe. He is particularly well known for his writing clinics. His research papers on peer review, conflict of interest, and other publishing topics have been published in JAMA, BMJ, Canadian Medical Association Journal, and Medical Journal of Australia.

In addition to his academic pursuits, Dr. Smith has extensive experience in fundraising and management. His degree in management science from the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University, California is sure to benefit icddr,b as it continues to build the capacity required to operationalise its current strategic plan.

Always eager to take advantage of new technology, Dr. Smith is an avid proponent of social media, and blogs regularly for the BMJ. You can follow him on Twitter at Richard56

 

(This news item has been taken from the icddr,b website link: http://www.icddrb.org/media-centre/news/4130-board-of-trustees-appoints-dr-richard-smith-as-chair for further dissemination. This service is given following an e-mail message containing  weekly bulletin of the icddr,b was received )

Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh (KIB) :Dr Syed Md Zainul Abedin

An ‘Agriculturist’ is a  graduate from any of the agricultural universities or faculties of Bangladesh or abroad .An ‘Agriculturist’  is also  known as ‘Krishibid’ which means one expert in ‘Agriculture’. The agricultural graduates popularly known as ‘Krishibid’ and ‘Agriculturist’ join the professional society Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh(KIB) which acts as the central body to look after the education,jobs,professional development,agricultural policy and development issues and relevant interests of  all members and concerned agricultural agencies.The leadership of the Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh(KIB) is elected through   countrywide election.The election is conducted by Election Commission at the centers located in all  Chapters spread over Bangladesh.

The Present executive council of Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh(KIB) was however elected uncontested for the years 2013 and 2014 term.A.F.M.Bahauddin Nasim and Mohammad Mobarak Ali have been elected  elected as the President and Secretary General respectively.Professor Dr.Kamal Uddin Ahmed has been elected as the Treasurer of the committee. Professor Dr.Shahidur Rashid Bhuiyan,Dr.Md.Rafiqul Islam Mandal,Md.Mohsin Miah,Dr.Md.Rafiqul Islam Mandal,Professor Dr.A.K.M Zakir Hossain,Mohammad Ataur Rahman,Md.Hamidur Rahman,Md.Khairul Alam (Prince) and Dr.G.M.Faruk(Dawn) are some members of the executive body.The full committee may be seen at this link:http://kib.org.bd/files/2012/12/Final-Result.pdf

The present leadership is taking interest in institutionalizing Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh(KIB).The activities of this forum was being organized from a century- old house situated in the former Dhaka Farm.The Dhaka Farm was established in 1905 with the goal of introducing modern agriculture on the basis of the recommendation of Famine Commission of India.The Dhaka Farm was also known as Manipuri Farm for a great number of farm laborers who came from Manipur of India and worked in the farm.The Dhaka Farm was a self contained body with laboratories,research institutes and educational centres.The Bangladesh Agricultural Institute located in the farm was later converted to Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University (SAU) in 2001.As the little house was very inadequate to run the multifarious activities of Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh(KIB) its  leadership had worked hard to establish a multistory building.The new building of Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh(KIB) is being constructed in great speed and it is expected that it will be soon inaugurated for usual activities.

Bangladesh is an agricultural economy.Agriculture supports its major income,employment and vital activities.’Krishibids’ or ‘Agriculturists’ play major role in the development of Bangladesh.The national association of agricultural graduates,Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh has been  organizing ‘Krishibid Dibosh’ or ‘Agriculturists’  Day’  on 13 February each year for a number of years.Various events are organized  to review the achievements of the agricultural graduates and strengthen the contributions of the agricultural graduates for the development of Bangladesh.All agricultural agencies of Bangladesh observe this day and take vow for development of agricultural sector of Bangladesh.Graduates working in various government and non -government agencies,universities and private sectors happily  take part in the festivities of the day.

Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh helps promote the education of the talented children of Krishibids who study in various

universities of Bangladesh.It is awarding scholarships to a large number of talented students.The Institution also extends help and support to the ailing Krishibids when they seek  assistance.

The agricultural sector of Bangladesh is composed of crops,livestock,fisheries and forestry.Ministries of Agriculture,Livestock,Fisheries and Forestry of the government administration are mainly manned by the agricultural graduates.Besides,many banks,specialized agencies and NGOs hire Agricultural graduates for their programmes.

Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh regularly takes part in activities relating to planning,appraisal, implementation,execution and evaluation of agricultural    policies and programmes in Bangladesh.It interacts with various government agencies and organizations for realization of its objectives and goals.It also regularly observes various national events with due honor.

Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh(KIB) organizes traditional cultural events like Pahela Baishakh(the first day of Bengali year) with great enthusiasm.This events being organized in Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University (SAU) premises for the last couple of years.The whole day programme starts with Panta Ilish and Pitha festival in the morning followed by seminar,discussion and lunch. The later part of the festival includes cultural events,games  and dinner.This annual festival is participated by a large number of Krishibids with their families.Another popular event of Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh(KIB) is its annual picnic.Members of the society join the picnic with their families in a scenic picnic spot out of Dhaka and enjoy the whole day there with many interesting activities.The last picnic was organized in Rangamati where more than a thousand individuals attended.The picnic was specially enjoyed by the children and wives of the members.They took part in many games,cultural function,quiz etc.They enjoyed the adjoining forest and photography  in the wonderful spot.You can see a photograph of the picnic at this link: http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/8451435387/

Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh maintains a website, http://kib.org.bd/ for sharing its activities with the members and concerned authorities.You are invited to visit the website and get the updates of the activities of   Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh(KIB).

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Workshop on Research to Inform Food and Nutrition Security Policies in Dhaka,Bangladesh:Dr.Syed Md.Zainul Abedin

 

A two-day Workshop on Research to Inform Food and Nutrition Security Policies was held on  3-4  July 2013 in the Ball  Room of Hotel Ruposhi Bangla ,Dhaka,Bangladesh.

Hon’ble Food Minister Dr.Muhammad Abdur Razzaque MP graced  the Inaugural Session of the workshop as the Chief Guest.He stated in his inaugural speech that Bangladesh is now referred across the world as a country of success for its food security and its ability to address the climate change impacts.He also said,“Once Bangladesh was known as country of famine, drought and flood, but now it is referred across the world as a country of success for its food security and its ability to address the climate change impacts,”

Dr Razzaque said the government considers agriculture, food security and nutrition as major priority areas.“Although we’ve made impressive achievement in grain production, we’re still facing considerable challenges in the areas of nutritional improvement, climate change adaptation, scarce natural resources, and access to safe and nutritious food,” he said.The Food Minister said achieving food and nutrition security is considered by the government as a key development agenda to make the country a middle income one as envisaged in the ‘Vision 2021’.About the country’s success in fighting poverty, he said although Bangladesh still has significant level of poverty, it has made a lot of progress in reducing poverty over the last decade.“Recently, FAO has awarded Bangladesh in recognition of our notable and outstanding progress in fighting hunger… we’ve achieved the UN Millennium Development Goal-1 as the prevalence of undernourishment reduced from 34.6 percent in 1990-92 to 16.8 percent in 2010-12.”Referring to the government steps for ensuring food security, Dr Razzaque said the ‘Country Investment Plan’ has been prepared to implement the food security programs following the ‘Bangladesh Food Security Investment Forum’ held in Dhaka in 2010.
Dr Razzaque said the government considers agriculture, food security and nutrition as major priority areas.“Although we’ve made impressive achievement in grain production, we’re still facing considerable challenges in the areas of nutritional improvement, climate change adaptation, scarce natural resources, and access to safe and nutritious food,” he said.The Food Minister said achieving food and nutrition security is considered by the government as a key development agenda to make the country a middle income one as envisaged in the ‘Vision 2021’.About the country’s success in fighting poverty, he said although Bangladesh still has significant level of poverty, it has made a lot of progress in reducing poverty over the last decade.“Recently, FAO has awarded Bangladesh in recognition of our notable and outstanding progress in fighting hunger… we’ve achieved the UN Millennium Development Goal-1 as the prevalence of undernourishment reduced from 34.6 percent in 1990-92 to 16.8 percent in 2010-12.”Referring to the government steps for ensuring food security, Dr Razzaque said the ‘Country Investment Plan’ has been prepared to implement the food security programmes following the ‘Bangladesh Food Security Investment Forum’ held in Dhaka in 2010. –
FAO Representative in Bangladesh Mike Robson,  EU Bangladesh Delegation-Head of Section-Rural Development  Gonzalo Serrano, NFPCSP-FAO Chief Technical Adviser Ciro Fiorillo and FPMU Director General Naser Farid, spoke at the session. Acting Secretary  of Food Ministry Abdul Awal Hawlader presided.
Guest of Honor,Mr.Kostas G.Stamoulis,Director ESA Division,FAO,Italy sent a message for the success of the workshop since he could not attend the same due to some other appointment.

 

The workshop  held on 3-4 July 2013 has been organized to present final results from 14 research studies and preliminary results from other 2 studies.The Workshop marks the final stage of a process initiated in 2009 with the approval of sixteen research topics by the Ministry of Food,based on the Governments priorities on Food and Nutrition Security.The 16 research were thereafter commissioned to National Research Institutions through an  open competition,with 14 of them initiated in October 2011 and currently completed and other 2 initiated in April 2012 and expected to be completed in fall  2013.The research outcomes are intended to inform Government’s policy making on food and nutrition security.They have  already been used as references for producing the National Food Policy Plan of Action and Country Invest Plan Monitoring Report 2013 that is the annual Government’s  report reviewing progress towards the PoA and CIP’s objective and the evolution of financing and delivery under the CIP.

The participants of the workshop include representatives of the Government of  Bangladesh,Civil Society Organizations(CSOs),Development Partners(DPs),national experts,media and relevant personnel.

The objectives of the workshop are to:

1.Present and discuss results and recommendations of 14 research programs.

2.Review preliminary results of 2 on-going research programs.

It may be mentioned  that the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations(FAO) and the Food Planning and Monitoring Unit (FPMU) of the Ministry of Food,Government of Bangladesh are jointly implementing the National Food Policy Capacity Strengthening Program(NFPCSP) with the financial support of the European Union(EU) and USAID.The  NFPCSP (www.nfpcsp.org) helps to strengthen institutional and human capacities in Bangladesh to design,implement and monitor  food security policies.Through its Research Grant Scheme,the NFPCSP has funded 16 policy relevant food security and nutrition research programs that will provide concrete policy options for improving food and nutrition security in Bangladesh.

The workshop facilitated dialogue among food security and nutrition researchers,and between researchers and policy makers  to maximize impact of the research completed and promote policy relevance of the two on-going research projects.

Thematic areas of The Workshop on Research to Inform Food and Nutrition Security Policies

1.Food Composition,Food Utilization and Nutrition Thematic Area:

In promoting infant and young child feeding,mothers need to be aware of how to plan and prepare complementary foods and  feed their young   children with the right amount and the right types of foods.

Some options of improved complementary feeding recipes based on food diversity and nutrient adequacy,as well as cultural acceptability had been prepared  and  made available.Similarly,on the basis of normative energy and nutrient requirements for the  Bangladeshi population,plans for sustainable diets at affordable cost with dietary  guidelines for a healthier nation was prepared and shared.Central to these issues are reliable food and nutrient composition data and Food Composition Tables(FCT) the updates for which were provided.Information on safety of foods based on a total diet study was shared to provide insights for agricultural planning,diet and nutritional assessment,food safety regulations  and consumer protection.

2.Food Access Thematic Area:

This theme was consisted of four studies,three of which related to social safety-nets.With the ambition to improve the effectiveness of safety-net programs,one of the studies presented results and policy recommendations on targeting and prioritization issues.Another study presented results on how social safety -nets could assist poor household to respond to climate change and a third study presented how safety-nets could promote productive outcomes for lasting poverty elimination and food security.The fourth study under this thematic area presented fresh evidence on urbanization and its implications for food security.

3.Food Availability Thematic Area:

There were eight studies in this thematic area.Three of them comprised food production inputs of land,ground water and credit which examined their trends,sustainability and accessibility. The study on land presented interesting results on land decline and or increase based on satellite imagery. This study created much interaction among the participants since it was one of the first such studies in Bangladesh.

Two studies investigated the structure and performance of key food markets of rice,and fruit ad vegetables.The rice market study results included an assessment of new milling technology.

Further three studies examined in depth profitability of farming across a range of crops,the trends and drivers in diversification of food production,and how the public rice procurement system influenced farming incentives.

All the studies presented new evidences based on data collected through purposefully designed household and farm surveys.

 

Detailed Program of The Workshop on Research to Inform Food and Nutrition Security Policies

Date        : 3-4 July 2013 (Wednesday and Thursday)

Venue     :Ruposhi Bangla Hotel,Ball Room,1 Minto Road,Dhaka 1000

Day 1      Wednesday   3 July 2013

0820-0920 Arrival and Registration

0920-0930 Guests take their seats

Session I     Inaugural Session

Chief Guest  :Dr.Muhammad Abdur Razzaque MP

Hon’ble  Minister,Ministry of Food

Chair             :Mr.Abdul Awal Hawlader ,Acting Secretary,Ministry of Food

Rapporteurs:Ms. Lalita Bhattacharjee,NFPCSP-FAO and

Mr.Mahbubur Rahman,FPMU

0930-0940 Welcome Address by Mr. Naser Farid

Director General,FPMU,Ministry of Food

0940-1000 Workshop Objectives by Mr. Ciro Fiorillo

Chief Technical Adviser,NFPCSP-FAO

1000-1010   Address by Guest of Honor,Mr.Kostas G.Stamoulis

Director ESA Division,FAO,Italy

1010-1020  Address by Guest of Honor,Mr.Philippe Jacques

Head of Cooperation,Delegation of the European Union to Bangladesh

1020-1030 Address by Guest of Honor,Mr.Richard Greene

Mission Director,USAID,Dhaka,Bangladesh

1030-1040 Address by Special Guest,Mr.Mike Robson

FAO Representative in Bangladesh

1040-1050 Address by the  Chair,Mr.Abdul Awal Hawlader ,Acting Secretary,Ministry of Food

1050-1115 Address by the Chief Guest,Dr.Muhammad Abdur Razzaque MP

Hon’ble  Minister,Ministry of Food

1115-1200 Tea/Coffee

Session II Food Availability:Land,Water,Credit,Profitabilty

  Chair:Prof Dr.M.A.Sattar Mandal,Member (Agriculture,Water Resources and Rural Institutions),Planning Commission,Bangladesh

Rapporteurs:Ms.Merzouk Quraishia,NFPCSP-FAO and

Mr.M.Ismail Miah,FPMU

1200-1215 Trends in the availability of agricultural land in Bangladesh

Mr.Md.Nazmul Hassan,Soil Resources Development Institute

1215-1220 Discussant-Mr.Shahin Yaqub,NFPCSP-FAO

1220-1230 General Discussion

1230-1245 The role of credit in food production and food security in Bangladesh

Prof.Dr.Bazlul Haque Khondker,Bureau of Economic Research,University of Dhaka

1245-1250 Discussant-Mr.M.Shahe Alam,NFPCSP-FAO

1250-1300 General Discussion

1300-1400 Prayer and Lunch

1400-1415 Sustainability of groundwater use for irrigation in North West Bangladesh

Dr.Nepal C.Dey,BRAC

1415-1420 Discussant-Mr.Rezaul Karim Talukder,NFPCSP-FAO

1420-1430 General Discussion

1430-1445  Financial and economic profitability of selected agricultural crops in Bangladesh

Prof.Dr.Mizanul H.Kajal ,Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University

1445-1450  Discussant-Mr.Rezaul Karim Talukder,NFPCSP-FAO

1450-1500 General Discussion

1500-1510 Remarks from the Chair

 

Session III  Access to Food:Safety-net and Migration

Chair:Prof.Donato Romano,

Department of Economics and Management,

Universita Degli Studi Firenze,Italy

 

Rapporteurs:Ms.Merzouk Quraishia,NFPCSP-FAO and

Mr.M.Abul Hashem,FPMU

1510-1525 Improving the targeting effectiveness of social safety-nets in Bangladesh

Prof.Dr.Abul Barkat,Manob Sakti Unnayan Kendra

1525-1530 Discussant-Mr.Shahin Yaqub,NFPCSP-FAO

1530 -1545 General Discussion

 

1545 -1600 Adapting social safety-net programs to climate change shocks: issues and options for Bangladesh

Prof.Dr.M.A.Awal,Department of Crop Botany,Bangladesh Agricultural University

1600-1605 Discussant-Mr.Shahin Yaqub,NFPCSP-FAO

1605- -1615 General Discussion

 

1615-1630 Rural-urban migration and its implications for food security in  Bangladesh

Prof.Dr.Md.Zakir Hossain,Department of Statistics,

Shahjalal  University of Science and Technology

1630-1635   Discussant-Mr.M.Shahe Alam,NFPCSP-FAO

1635-1650  General Discussion

 

1650-1705 Social safety-nets and productive outcomes :evidence and implications for Bangladesh

Dr.Ismat Ara Begum,Department of Agricultural Economics,

Faculty of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology

Bangladesh Agricultural University

1705–1710 Discussant-Mr.Rezaul Karim Talukder,NFPCSP-FAO

1710-1725  General Discussion

1725-1735 Remarks from the Chair

1735-1750 Tea/Coffee

 

Day 2      Thursday   4 July 2013

Session IV Nutrition :Food Composition and Dietary Intake

Chair:Prof.Dr.M.Q.K.Talukdar

Chairman,Centre for Women and Child Health

Rapporteurs:Mr.M.A.Mannan,NFPCSP-FAO and

Mr.M.Faruq Al Banna,FPMU

0900-0915 Food composition tables for Bangladesh

Prof.Dr.Nazma Shaheen,Centre for Advanced Research and Studies,

University of Dhaka

0915-0920 Discussant -Ms. Lalita Bhattacharjee,NFPCSP-FAO

0920-0930  General Discussion

 

0930-0945 Development of a complementary feeding manual for Bangladesh

Dr.A.K.M.Iqbal Kabir,Bangladesh Breastfeeding Foundation(BBF)

0945-0950 Discussant -Mr.M.A.Mannan,NFPCSP-FAO

0950-1000  General Discussion

 

1000-1015 Desirable dietary pattern for Bangladesh

Dr.Quamrun Nahar,BIRDEM

 

1015-1020 Discussant -Ms. Lalita Bhattacharjee,NFPCSP-FAO

1020-1030  General Discussion

 

1030-1045 Consumption of unsafe foods:heavy metal,mineral and trace element contamination

Prof.Dr.Md.Rafiqul Islam,Department of Soil Science,

Bangladesh Agricultural University

1045-1050 Discussant -Mr.M.A.Mannan,NFPCSP-FAO

1050-1100  General Discussion

1100-1115 Remarks from the Chair

1115-1130 Tea/Coffee

 

Session V  Food Availability : Diversification,Efficiency and Support to Farmers

Chair:Mr. Ciro Fiorillo

Chief Technical Adviser,NFPCSP-FAO   and

Prof.Dr.Shamsul Alam,Member(General Economics Division)

Planning Commission,Bangladesh

1130-1145 Improving the marketing systems of fruits and vegetables in Bangladesh

Prof.Dr.Md.Kamrul Hassan,Department of Horticulture,

Bangladesh Agricultural University

1145-1150 Discussant -Mr.Shaikh Abdus Sabur,NFPCSP-FAO

1150-1200  General Discussion

 

1200-1215 Policy options for supporting agricultural diversification in Bangladesh

Dr.Md.Monayem Miah,Agricultural Economics Division,

Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute

1215-1220   Discussant-Mr.M.Shahe Alam,NFPCSP-FAO

1220-1230  General Discussion

 

1230-1245 Structure,conduct and performance of the rice market and the impact of technological changes in milling.

Prof.Dr.Shankar K.Raha,Institute of Agribusiness and Development Studies,Bangladesh Agricultural University

1245-1250 Discussant -Mr.Shaikh Abdus Sabur,NFPCSP-FAO

1250-1300  General Discussion

 

1300-1315 Effectiveness of Bangladesh’s rice procurement system and possible alternatives:supporting farmers’ income and sustaining production incentives

Dr.Mohammad Jahangir Alam,Department of Agribusiness and Marketing ,

Faculty of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology,

Bangladesh Agricultural University

1315–1320 Discussant -Mr.Shaikh Abdus Sabur,NFPCSP-FAO

1320-1330  General Discussion

1330-1345  Remarks from the Chair

1345-1400 Closing Remarks by Mr. Naser Farid

Director General,FPMU,Ministry of Food

1400-1430 Prayer and Lunch

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A partnership in support of women’s higher education – L’Oréal and Asian University for Women sign MOU

A partnership in support of women’s higher education – L’Oréal and Asian University for Women sign MOU Careers – 28.06.2013

Asian University Women

Clichy, 28 June 2013 – L’Oréal and the Asian University for Women (AUW) have today announced an agreement through which the two organizations share their commitment to promoting talented young women. Jérôme Tixier, L’Oréal’s Executive Vice-President of Human Resources and Kamal Ahmad, AUW Founder and President & CEO, Asian University for Women Support Foundation, signed a 4-year memorandum of understanding in the presence of Cherie Blair, Chancellor, Asian University for Women and Jean-Paul Agon, Chairman & CEO, L’Oréal Group.

L’Oréal committed to support the AUW and its students in areas such as:

  • Providing two scholarships of US$15,000 per year per student for a 4-year period, a total of US$120,000
  • Offering three 10-week summer internship opportunities in L’Oréal’s subsidiaries in India, China and Vietnam
  • Contributing to academic activities by appointing a mentor for each sponsored student among L’Oréal’s senior women executives, helping to design case studies and workshops, lectures from senior management and providing students with job search coaching
  • Giving students access to L’Oréal’s recruitment opportunities.

Jérôme Tixier, Executive Vice-President Human Resources, L’Oréal Group said, “The mission of the Asian University for Women, empowering women to become leaders of tomorrow, is an important one that resonates with L’Oréal’s core values – to ensure a diversity of talent by promoting women at the highest level of the organization. We look forward to contributing to supporting AUW’s programme and it’s community as it forges ahead in Bangladesh.”

“The mission of the AUW is to offer women access to world-class education in a region where they are often denied opportunities. This would not be possible without the support and collaboration of multinationals such as L’Oréal. Being the world’s leading cosmetics company and one that focuses on women, I am confident that our students will greatly benefit from this rewarding partnership with L’Oréal,” said Kamal Ahmad, AUW Founder and President & CEO, Asian University for Women Support Foundation.


About AUW
AUW is an independent, international university for women located in Chittagong, Bangladesh.  The University focuses on providing a high-quality liberal arts and sciences education to future women leaders, regardless of their background.  AUW offers a one-year, pre-collegiate bridge program called the Access Academy, as well as a four-year undergraduate program. AUW provides need-based full scholarships to many of its students. Currently AUW students come from 12 countries in Asia and the Middle East. For more about AUW, please visit www.asian-university.org.

About L’Oréal
L’Oréal, the world’s leading beauty company, has catered to all forms of beauty in the world for over 100 years and has built an unrivalled portfolio of 27 international, diverse and complementary brands. With sales amounting to 22.5 billion euros in 2012, L’Oréal employs 72,600 people worldwide. In 2013, the Ethisphere Institute, a leading international think-tank for business ethics, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability, recognized L’Oréal as one of the World’s Most Ethical Companies. This is the fourth time that L’Oréal has received this distinction. www.loreal.com

 

                      
A Partnership in Support of Women’s Higher Education – L’Oréal and Asian University for Women sign MOU
Clichy, 28 June 2013 – L’Oréal and the Asian University for Women (AUW) have today announced an agreement through which the two organizations share their commitment to promoting talented young women. Jerome Tixier, L’Oreal’s Executive Vice-President of Human Resources and Kamal Ahmad, AUW Founder and President & CEO, Asian University for Women Support Foundation, signed a 4-year memorandum of understanding in the presence of Cherie Blair, Chancellor, Asian University for Women, Irina Bokova, General-Director, UNESCO and Jean-Paul Agon, Chairman & CEO, L’Oréal Group.
From Left: Mr. Dipak Jain, Professor at INSEAD, Mr. Jean-Paul Agon, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of L’Oreal Group; Ms. Sofia Wellesley, Lawyer and Mrs. Cherie Blair’s Partner in Omnia Strategy; Mr. Kamal Ahmad, President and CEO of the Asian University for Women Support Foundation; Mrs. Cherie Blair, the Chancellor of Asian University for Women; Ms. Sara Ravella, Executive Vice President for Communication, Sustainability, and Public Affairs of L’Oreal Group; Mr. Jean-Claude Le Grand, Director of International HR Development and Corporate Diversity Director of L’Oreal Group; Ms. Sylvie Dangelser, Corporate HR Director of Learning for Development of L’Oreal Group; and Mr. Jerome Tixier, Executive Vice-President of Human Resources and Advisor to the President of L’Oreal Group.
  

From Left: Mr. Jerome Tixier, L’Oreal’s Executive Vice-President of Human Resources and Mrs. Cherie Blair, Chancellor, Asian University for Women

L’Oréal committed to support the AUW and its students in areas such as:

·        Providing two scholarships of US$15,000 per year per student for a 4-year period, a total of US$120,000

·        Offering three 10-week summer internship opportunities in L’Oréal’s subsidiaries in India, China and Vietnam

·        Contributing to academic activities by appointing a mentor for each sponsored student among L’Oréal’s senior women executives, helping to design case studies and workshops, lectures from senior management and providing students with job search coaching

·        Giving students access to L’Oréal’s recruitment opportunities.

Jérôme Tixier, Executive Vice-President Human Resources, L’Oréal Group said, “The mission of the Asian University for Women, empowering women to become leaders of tomorrow, is an important one that resonates with L’Oréal’s core values – to ensure a diversity of talent by promoting women at the highest level of the organization. We look forward to contributing to supporting AUW’s programme and it’s community as it forges ahead in Bangladesh.”

“The mission of the AUW is to offer women access to world-class education in a region where they are often denied opportunities. This would not be possible without the support and collaboration of multinationals such as L’Oréal. Being the world’s leading cosmetics company and one that focuses on women, I am confident that our students will greatly benefit from this rewarding partnership with L’Oréal,”said Kamal Ahmad, AUW Founder and President & CEO, Asian University for Women Support Foundation.

About AUW

AUW is an independent, international university for women located in Chittagong, Bangladesh. The University focuses on providing a high-quality liberal arts and sciences education to future women leaders, regardless of their background. AUW offers a one-year, pre-collegiate bridge program called the Access Academy, as well as a four-year undergraduate program. AUW provides need-based full scholarships to many of its students. Currently AUW students come from 12 countries in Asia and the Middle East. For more about AUW, please visit http://www.asian-university.org/

About L’Oréal

L’Oréal, the world’s leading beauty company, has catered to all forms of beauty in the world for over 100 years and has built an unrivalled portfolio of 27 international, diverse and complementary brands. With sales amounting to 22.5 billion euros in 2012, L’Oréal employs 72,600 people worldwide. In 2013, the Ethisphere Institute, a leading international think-tank for business ethics, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability, recognized L’Oréal as one of the World’s Most Ethical Companies. This is the fourth time that L’Oréal has received this distinction. http://www.loreal.com/

Media Inquiries:

 

L’Oréal Group

Name: Carolyn Giang

Phone: + 33 (0) 1 47 56 8788

Asian University for Women

Name: Katsuki Sakai

Phone: +1-617-914-0500

Media contacts:

Asian University for Women: Katsuki Sakai, [email protected] | +1-617-914-0500
L’Oréal Group: Carolyn Giang, [email protected]  | + 33 (0) 1 47 56 8788

The press release has been published for further dissemination as received from the AUW mailing service.

Australia extends its expertise in water resource management to Asia (ICIMOD News)

Australia extends its expertise in water resource management to Asia

25 Jun 2013

Canberra, Australia

Scientists from Australia’s national science agency, CSIRO, are applying their knowledge in transboundary river basin management to improve the livelihoods of people living in some of the poorest parts of Asia. CSIRO and its partners have begun work in the Koshi River Basin which stretches from China, across the Himalayas through Nepal and discharges into the Ganges River in India.

The Koshi Basin is home to millions of people who rely on its fertile floodplains for their livelihoods. There is growing pressure to address development challenges in the Basin, in particular population growth and an increasing demand for energy, whilst working within constraints of natural hazards exacerbated by a changing climate, such as floods, drought, landslides, sediment movement and debris flow.

In a collaborative four-year project, scientists from CSIRO’s Water for a Healthy Country Flagship will provide technical assistance to the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development’s (ICIMOD) Koshi Basin Programme. CSIRO scientists will develop an integrated basin-wide modelling system to improve management of the Koshi River Basin. This system will incorporate information on water availability, freshwater environments and the ecosystem services they provide and social considerations such as the effect of changes in water availability on livelihoods. The system will contribute to development in the Koshi Basin in a socially and environmentally sustainable manner and support national and transboundary water reforms.

“Australia has a long history of managing a scarce and variable water resource, and sharing this resource amongst competing users,” said CSIRO’s Water for a Healthy Country Flagship Director, Dr Carol Couch.  “There is much the Australian water experience will bring to this project to help improve sustainable development and climate resilience, reduce water stress, and inform water-related decision making and transboundary issues. We will draw on the suite of large river basin assessments undertaken across Australia in recent years, such as the Murray-Darling Basin Sustainable Yields assessment.

“Research will be undertaken as a partnership between Australian organisations and ICIMOD researchers, based in Nepal. We will also be learning from ICIMOD, particularly in relation to sediment movement, snow melt and glacial processes,” said Dr Couch.

“At ICIMOD, we have taken a long-term, transboundary approach to support river basin management. This includes testing, piloting, and monitoring the innovations needed to address common issues related to climate change, cryosphere, water resources management and livelihood promotion,” said Dr David Molden, Director General of ICIMOD.

“The Koshi Basin Programme will provide a platform for national and international researchers and decision makers to come together to promote transboundary cooperation and integrated water resource management practices and policies. This will also include the development of measures for risk management as well as equitable access to water for energy and food security,” said Dr Molden.

Work undertaken by CSIRO this year will consist of a review and analysis of the existing knowledge base, capacity building and the development of a prototype model for the Koshi River Basin that incorporates information on water, climate, hydropower, freshwater environments, irrigation and social issues including poverty alleviation. The knowledge gained from this project will culminate in the development of a robust integrated basin-wide modelling framework, using eWater’s hydrological modelling platform, Source.

Project partners

This work is supported by the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) through the Sustainable Development Investment Strategy. Through the Strategy, AusAID works with a portfolio of partners to address the challenges of water, food and energy security in South Asia.

The International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) is a regional intergovernmental learning and knowledge sharing centre serving the eight regional member countries of the Hindu Kush Himalayan region – Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, and Pakistan.

CSIRO is working in conjunction with the International Centre of Excellence in Water Resources Management (ICE WaRM) and eWater to deliver a coordinated approach to water resource management, combining excellence in training (ICE WaRM), world class modelling software (eWater) and robust science (CSIRO).

For more information, please contact:

Carol Couch,

Director, CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship,
Phone: +61 (0) 26 246 4565
Website: www.csiro.au

Media contact: Sarah Wilson, CSIRO,
Phone: +61 (0)26 246 4566, mob: +61 (0)477 710 340
E-mail: [email protected]

Nira Gurung
Communications Officer, ICIMOD
Email: [email protected][email protected]
Tel. +977 1 5003222
This article has been taken from the website of ICIMOD  for further dissemination.You may access the article directly at this link : http://www.icimod.org/?q=10974

2013 Monsoon Floods in Nepal and India: What happened and what could have been done?(ICIMOD Article)

2013 Monsoon Floods in Nepal and India: What happened and what could have been done?

24 Jun 2013

While the world is waking up to the news of the horrific scale of the recent flood disaster in the Mahakali basin of Nepal and Uttarakhand in India, several questions are being asked: what kind of climatic events led to this disaster? Could anything have been done to reduce the loss of life and property? What can we learn from this disaster for the future? In this brief note, we address some of these burning questions.

Mahakali flood disaster

The Mahakali river is a transboundary river between Nepal and India with a catchment area of 14,871 km2. It flows for about 223 km in Nepal and around 323.5 km in India to its confluence with the Karnali River in India. The recent rainfall events in the western and far western regions of Nepal and India affected 20 districts in Nepal and several districts in the Indian states of Uttarakhand and Himachal Pradesh. The floods and landslides that ensued have left hundreds of people dead or missing and destroyed property worth millions of dollars. While this is not the first event of this kind (see annexes), it is certainly the most severe in the last 50 years and it happened at the beginning of the monsoon when no one was expecting.

Figure 1. Flood and landslide affected districts in Nepal

Intense rainfall events

The monsoon rains usually hit Central Nepal around 15 June and Far Western Nepal around 20 June. This year, the monsoon quickly engulfed the region (http://www.imd.gov.in/; Figure 2). The real-time monitoring station in Nepal reported 80.4 mm of rain on 16 June and 221.8 mm on 17 June at Dipayal, which adjoins the Mahakali flood disaster area (http://dhm.gov.np/; Figure 3 and Figure 4). Surrounding areas such as Dadeldhura, Dhangadi, and Birendranagar in the Far Western Development Region of Nepal recorded more than 150 mm of rainfall in 24 hours on 17 June 2013. Continuous rain in the upper catchments caused the water level in the Seti river east of the Mahakali to rise from 6.94 m to 11.56 m and 5.53 m to 12.81 m in the Karnali at Chisapani on 17 June, as measured by Department of Hydrology and Meteorology, Nepal’s real time network. Unfortunately, there are no real time stations installed by the Department on the Mahakali river. One to three day weather forecasts provided by United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) also indicated heavy rainfall on 17 and 18 June on the border of Nepal and India (Figure 5). Cumulative 3 day TRMM rainfall estimates from 16 June to 18 June show heavy rainfall in the flood affected regions of Nepal and India (Figure 6). The discharge in the Mahakali river rose from 139,000 cubic feet per second to 440,716 cubic feet per second on 17 June – well in excess of the flow of 398,000 cubic feet seconds recorded in the 2012 monsoon (http://www.kantipuronline.com/2013/06/18/top-story/massive-floods-in-mahakali-river-6-killed-update/373456/).

Figure 2. Advance of southwest monsoon, 2013

Figure 3. Hourly rainfall at Dipayal on 17 June (Department of Hydrology and Meteorology, 2013)

Figure 4. Daily rainfall summary on the Seti at Dipayal, June 2013 (Department of Hydrology and Meteorology, 2013)

Figure 5. Satellite image of 24-hour precipitation in mm (US NOAA)

Figure 6. Cumulative 3 day TRMM satellite rainfall estimate

Impact

While we do not know the full extent of the devastation in Nepal and India, reports are trickling in. In Darchula, in the Far Western Development Region, the flood swept away 77 buildings and displaced 2,500 people (http://www.nepalnews.com/archive/2013/jun/jun18/news12.php). Six were killed in Achham and Baitadi districts and eight are missing in Dhungaad. A reported 150 families have been rendered homeless in Dodhara and Chadani and around 30 families have been affected in Kuda. Four houses in Salyan have been damaged due to a landslide. In Kalikot district, 4 people are dead and 11 missing and 27 families have been displaced. Flood in the Karnali river has affected many villages in the southeast region of Kailali, inundating large areas in Tikapur Municipality and the VDCs of Lalbojhi, Bhajani, Thapapur and Khailad. In Bardiya the floods have intensely affected the Rajapur Tappu region where 2,000 houses were inundated by the Karnali river. Approximately 600 families are still at great risk in Khairichandanpur (http://www.ekantipur.com/2013/06/19/headlines/Monsoon-fury-claims-at-least-20-many-missing/373488/).
Upstream from India-Nepal Bridge in Darchula, Nepal

Before                                                    During Flood

A school downstream from India-Nepal Bridge, Darchula, India

Before                                                    During Flood

Downstream from India-Nepal Bridge, Darchula, India

Before                                                    During Flood

The effects were even more devastating in Uttarakhand in India. The flood
occurred in the peak tourist and pilgrimage season, increasing the number of causalities, missing, and affected. The monsoon arrived 15 days early in Uttarakhand with continuous rainfall between Friday 14 June and Monday 17 June 2013. This resulted in increased water level and flow in the two main rivers, the Alakananda and Bhagirathi. Cloudbursts and landslides at various locations added to the devastation and impact on the lives of the people. Up to 17 June, the rainfall ranged from 50 mm up to 500 mm. Over 60 hours of continuous rain disrupted normal life. According to the Uttarakhand State government’s disaster mitigation and management centre, causalities could run into the thousands with about 90 dharamshalas (rest houses for pilgrims) swept away in the floods. Five districts in the state have been affected, more than 550 people have died, thousands are still missing, and over 50,000 are stranded.

What we have learnt from this series of events?

Two main lessons can be drawn from the Mahakali and Uttarakhand flood disasters: The severity of the disaster could have been mitigated with a better end-to-end information system and proper infrastructure planning would have reduced the damage.
Accordingly, we need to:
  • Put in place institutional mechanisms that that can use technological advances in forecasting:
Although some warnings were disseminated by the India Meteorological Organization about the possibility of high to intense rainfall, this information was not transmitted to the
people at risk. There is a need to strengthen disaster management and preparedness mechanisms, which requires awareness and sensitization at various levels to ensure that early warning information is conveyed to end users well in advance. Advances in technology have made it possible to provide three to four hours warning of such events – which is enough to save lives. We need to develop the institutional mechanisms to fully use such technological advances.
  • Set up more hydrometeorological stations on transboundary rivers:
There is no river-level hydrological monitoring station on the Mahakali river for flood forecasting and early warning. It is recommended that a river monitoring station for early warning be set up jointly by Nepal and India to provide people with some lead-time and improve flood forecasting and management in the basin.
  • Carefully plan infrastructure in the mountains:
The Hindu newspaper put it succinctly when it said that damage could have been contained through proper policies, especially regarding infrastructure development. The development of infrastructure in mountain areas, whether roads or buildings, is challenging. Many mountain roads are contributing a huge sediment load to our rivers and inviting landslides. Many of the settlements are located along flood plains and have developed over the years, encroaching the river banks and increasing the vulnerability to floods. These settlements include residential homes, offices, resorts and restaurants to name a few. There has been limited or no efforts to move these settlements to higher grounds. In the recent floods, large stretches of road and settlements were washed away stranding thousands of people and raising questions about their design, construction, and monitoring. Infrastructure development in the mountains has to be undertaken with caution and proper planning, and must apply different standards to that in the plains.
  • There is also a need to investigate whether or not there have been significant land use changes in the basin resulting in increased runoff.

ICIMOD’s role in Disaster Risk Reduction

As a regional knowledge and learning centre serving the eight countries of the Hindu Kush Himalayas – Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, and Pakistan – ICIMOD is uniquely placed to address issues of a transboundary nature. ICIMOD is focused on improving our understanding of the complex hydrological processes of the Hindu Kush Himalayan region and promoting data and information sharing. It seeks to facilitate cooperation on policies, the timely sharing of information, and the proper management of the water resources.
ICIMOD is working for an economically and environmentally sound mountain ecosystem to improve the living standards of mountain people and sustain vital ecosystem services – now and for the future. ICIMOD has chosen to focus on hazards and disasters related to adverse weather and climate conditions, such as high intensity rainfall, glacial lake outburst floods, regional floods, and flash floods. In order to address the risks facing mountain communities and better understand the nature of hazards that might lead to disasters, ICIMOD has outlined a series of activities to be undertaken as part of ‘Disaster risk reduction and community resilience’ including the:
  • assessment of vulnerability of communities and building their resilience to multi-hazards;
  • assessment of the impact of climate change on ecosystems, natural hazards, and human health;
  • delivery of training in disaster risk reduction; and
  • provision of a platform for sharing knowledge and experiences within disaster risk reduction.
ICIMOD, in partnership with the World Meteorological Organization and partner countries from Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Nepal, and Pakistan, is working to establish a regional flood information system. Twenty-four hydrometeorological stations have been installed to share real time data to strengthen flood forecasting in four countries. In Nepal, nine hydrometeorological stations have been installed in the Koshi basin and eight in the Kailash Sacred Landscape.
ICIMOD aims to assist mountain people in implementing improved disaster risk reduction at national and regional levels addressing upstream-downstream linkages for saving lives and livelihoods. This is achieved through the implementation of transboundary programmes in partnership with regional partner institutions, exploring the application of satellite-based technologies for disaster risk reduction, supporting networking, facilitating the exchange of experience, and serving as a regional knowledge hub, among other things. Institutional strengthening and capacity building of our partner institutions is also being undertaken to contribute to effective disaster risk reduction.

Annex 1. Recent floods in Nepal with disaster details

Region

Year

Disaster

Mahakali June 2013 Final report still to be prepared
Dang June 2012 145 families were displaced and 2,200 household were affected by flash floods
Batadi, Achham, Kalikot, Jajrkot, Rukum, Rolpa, Kaski, Tanahu, Makwanpur, Gorkha, Nuwakot, Sindhuli, Sarlahi, Solukhumbu June 2011 14 districts affected by floods and landslide; 25 deaths; 2 missing; 4 injured; 515 houses destroyed
Dailekh, Jajarkot, Rukum, Palpa, Rupandehi, Parbat, Dhading, Sindhuli, Solukhumbu, August 2011 9 districts affected; 65 deaths; 35 missing; 24 injured; 110 houses destroyed
Kanchanpur September 2010 60 houses damaged on the Mahakali river
Dadeldhura, Bajura, Achham, Rukum, Kaski, Illam June–August 2010 6 districts affected; 98 deaths; 8 missing; 29 injured; 2,835 houses destroyed; 39,000 people affected

Annex 2. Recent floods in India with disaster details

Region

Year

Disaster

Uttarakhand, Shimla,

Himachal Pradesh

June 2013 Final report still to be prepared
Guwahati,

Brahmaputra river overflow

July 2012 80 deaths from flood; 16 buried in landslide; 11 missing
Assam July 2012 95 deaths; 12 missing
Uttarkashi district,

Ganga flood

August 2012 34 deaths; 80 houses damaged
Uttar Pradesh, Bihar September 2011 30 deaths; 10 missing in Brahmani river