Tag Archives: agriculture

Role of Information & Communication Technology (ICT) in Agricultural Extension of Bangladesh: Syeda Tasnim Jannat

 

The economy of Bangladesh depends chiefly on agriculture. The challenge of feeding the increasing population from the shrinking land and water resources is a great task. Many agencies are working to support the farmers to produce food materials and related products. A number of approaches are taken to provide farmers required information to support their farming operation. The agricultural system of Bangladesh has a long history of coping with the challenges. The system has experienced remarkable development over time. Inclusion of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) enhanced the capacity of the system to face the challenges. Agricultural technologies generated by Agricultural Research Institutes are now being disseminated to the farmers by the Agricultural Extension agencies. The use of ICT technologies for disseminating agricultural technologies has been proved to be useful for enhancement of production. The major ICT technologies for transferring scientific innovations are mobile phone and computer. It has been revealed through a survey of Katalyst in 2013 that the farmers seek the following information through the helpline of mobile phone.

  • 67% regarding pest management of crops
  • 2% regarding seed
  • 7% regarding fertilizer
  • 10% regarding cultivation technologies
  • 14% regarding other issues

The same survey revealed that 84% rural farmers use mobile phones, 67% farm families use more than one mobile phones and 73% farm families use more than one sims. By using ICT 7 lakh 45 thousand farm families were benefited and the average income increased BDT 10, 500 per family.

This article has been prepared on the basis of Round Table Conference/Workshop arranged by popular newspaper Prothom Alo held on 06 June 2015. The Round Table was the outcome of collaboration of the government of Bangladesh, Katalyst, Swisscontact, UKAID, SDC and DANIDA. Twelve distinguished persons participated in the important round table. Summary of the conference was published on 03 July, 2015 in Prothom Alo as a supplementary. I tried to capture the salient points of the discussion from the supplementary to share with the readers around the world. The participants of the conference were:

  1. Sheikh Hemayet Hossain, Director, Field Services Wing, Department of Agricultural Extension (DAE)
  2. Mokbul Hossain, Project Director & Principal Scientific Officer, Soil Resources Development Institute (SRDI)
  3. Md. Zahangir Alam, Deputy Director, Mass Communication, Agriculture Information Service (AIS)
  4. Jalal Hossain, Head of Business Strategy and Strategic Project, Banglalink
  5. Mohammad Muntasir Hossain, General Manager, VAAS & Digital Services, Grameen Phone
  6. Nujhat Jannatun Naim, Senior Executive, Infrastructure Business, Banglalink
  7. Kashfia Ahmed, CEO, Win Incorporate
  8. Sumaia Sadia Raihan, Lead Specialist, VAAS & Digital Services, Grameen Phone
  9. Remizius Remi, Head of Technical, Win Miyaki Ltd.
  10. Nafia Hussain, Manager, Katalyst
  11. Mohammad Sakib Khaled, Business Consultant, Katalyst
  12. Abdul Quiyum, Associate Editor, Prothom Alo

Following recommendations emerged from the discussion of the Round Table conference:

  • All concerned including mass media should work together to alert the farmers
  • The efficiency of farmers should be enhanced. All concerned including government, Telecom companies shpuld take responsibilities for the purpose.
  • Farmers should be provided standard information after careful selection and vetting
  • Farmers should be given such agricultural information which they can trust
  • All concerned should deeply contemplate on the best means/ways of communicating with the farmer.
  • There should be seals of the government on the supplied agricultural information.

The round table conference organized by Prothom Alo was a pioneering initiative. This initiative may inspire other media to come forward to explore various problems and prospects of agriculture sector. Our country and concerned people will invariably be benefited from such initiatives.

Agricultural Programmes of Television and Radio of Bangladesh : Syeda Tasnim Jannat

The electronic media of Bangladesh play vital role in disseminating and popularizing agricultural technologies.Among the electronic media television and radio contribute immensely for enhancing the spread of agricultural technologies.The regular extension service run by public agencies and non government organizations is strengthened by the contributions of electronic media.

You can have an idea from the following information that both  public and private electronic media are contributing for disseminating agricultural technologies.Since the economy of Bangladesh is chiefly  based on agriculture all electronic media should engage more time and resources on this sector.However,the electronic media who have come forward in popularizing agricultural technologies,practices and business must be congratulated for understanding the reality.

Agricultural Programmes of Television and Radio of Bangladesh

 

Media Programme (with brief description) Frequency
Bangladesh Television(BTV)Public terrestrial TV Channel 1.Mati o Manush(Soil and Man),a popular programme showing agricultural technologies and disseminating relevant information.2.Banglar Krishi(Agriculture of Bengal),regular daily technology disseminating programme3.Krishi Songbad(Agriculture News),agricultural news Telecast on five days a week at 0700 P.M. on Monday,Tuesday and Wednesday and at 0610 A.M. on Thursday and Friday.The programme is retelecast on the following days at 0810 A.M.2.Telecast everyday at 0725 A.M.3.Telecast regularly with news
Channel IPrivate TV Channel 1.Hridoye Mati o Manush(Soil and Man in the Heart)2.Hridoye Mati o Manusher Dak(Call of Soil and Man in the Heart)3.Krishi Songbad(Agriculture News) 1.Telecast on Saturday at 0935 P.M. and retelecast on Sunday at 1130 A.M.2.Telecast on 0305 P.M.3.Telecast regularly with all news
Bangla VisionPrivate TV Channel 1.Shaymol Bangla(Green Bangla) 1.Telecast on Thursday at 0550 P.M.Retelecast on Thurday at 0330 A.M.,Friday at 0830 A.M. and on Wednesday at 0930 A.M.
Boishakhi TelevisionPrivate TV Channel Krishi o Jibon(Agriculture and Life) Telecast on Sunday at 0620 A.M. and retelecast on Monday at 0230 A.M.
GTVPrivate TV Channel Shobuj Bangla(Green Bangla) Telecast on Friday at 0630 A.M.and retelecast on Friday at 0945 A.M.,Saturday at 1130 A.M. and Monday at 0530 P.M.
Bangladesh Betar,Dhaka(Radio Bangladesh,Dhaka) 1.Desh Amar Mati Amar(My Country My Soil),National programme2.Krishi Shomachar(Agricultural Affairs),National programme3.Shonali Foshol(Golden Crop),Regional Programme4.Shobuj Prantor(Green Field),National programme5.Shoshho Shaymol(Green Crop),National programme

6.Amar Desh(My Country),

National programme

1.Broadcast daily at 0705-0730 P.M.2.Broadcast daily at 0625-0630 A.M.3.Broadcast daily at 0605-0635P.M.4.Broadcast on Fridays at 0550-0600 P.M.5.Broadcast on the 3rd Thursdays at 0830-0900 P.M.6.Broadcast daily at 0435-0435 P.M.
Bangladesh Betar,Chittagong 1.Krishi Shomachar (Agricultural Affairs),Regional programme2.Krishi Khamar ( AgriculturalFarm),Regional programme 1.Broadcast daily at 0625-0630 A.M. in Summer and at 0655-0700 A.M.in Winter2.Broadcast daily at 0610-0650 P.M.
Bangladesh Betar,Khulna 1.Krishi Shomachar (Agricultural Affairs),Regional programme2.Chashabad(Cultivation),Regional programme 1.Broadcast daily at 0625-0630 A.M. in Summer and at 0655-0700 A.M.in Winter2.Broadcast daily at 0610-0650 P.M.
Bangladesh Betar,Rangpur 1.Krishi Shomachar (Agricultural Affairs),Regional programme2.Khet Khamare(In Field and Farm),Regional programme 1.Broadcast daily at 0625-0630 A.M. in Summer and at 0655-0700 A.M.in Winter2.Broadcast daily at 0605-0635 P.M.
Bangladesh Betar,Rajshahi 1.Khet Khamar Shomachar ( Affairs of Field and Farm),Regional programme2.Shobuj Bangla(Green Bangla),Regional programme 1.Broadcast daily at 0625-0630 A.M. in Summer and at 0655-0700 A.M.in Winter2.Broadcast daily at 0605-0645P.M.
Bangladesh Betar,Sylhet 1.Ajker Chashabad(Today’s Cultivation),Regional programme2.Shaymol Sylhet(Green Sylhet),Regional programme 1.Broadcast daily at 0625-0630 A.M. in Summer and at 0655-0700 A.M.in Winter2.Broadcast daily at 0605-0645P.M. except Friday
Bangladesh Betar,Rangamati Khamarbari (Farmhouse),Regional programme Broadcast daily at 0320-0330 P.M.
Bangladesh Betar,Bandarban Krishikotha(Agriculture Talk),Regional programme Broadcast on Sunday,Monday,Tuesday and Wednesday at 0405-0425 P.M.
Bangladesh Betar,Barisal Krishikotha(Agriculture Talk),Regional programme Broadcast on Saturday,Monday,Tuesday,Thursday and Friday at 0315-0335 P.M.
Bangladesh Betar,Cox’s Bazar Shonali Prantor(Golden Field),Regional programme Broadcast on Friday,Saturday,Sunday and Tuesday at 0305-0330 P.M.
Bangladesh Betar,Thakurgaon Kishan Mati Desh(Farmer Soil Country),Regional programme Broadcast on Friday,Saturday,Monday and Wednesday at 0605-0630 P.M.
Bangladesh Betar,Comilla Shujola Shufola (Well-watered Well-produced )Regional programme Broadcast on Sunday,Tuesday,and Thursday at 0520-0530 P.M.
Agricultural Radios

Various programmes ,

Regional programme

Broadcast daily from morning till night

Boishakhi TelevisionPrivate TV Channel          Shofolotar Shat Rong(Seven Colors of Success)                                                                                                                                                Broadcast on Saturday at 0300 P.M.

Library Exhibit Honours Canadian Entomology(Taken from ‘at Guelph’ for further Dissemination)

At Guelph

Library Exhibit Honours Canadian Entomology

Rare books, insect drawings date to 1634

BY TERESA PITMAN
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013

The University of Guelph Library archives hold several water-colour drawings by Rev. Thomas Fyles, a member of the Montreal branch of the Entomological Society of Ontario. He painted this larvae and moth in 1901. “It represents the typical depiction of the insect world at the time,” says Prof. Mark Sears. “How  far have we come in 100 years.”

The University of Guelph Library archives hold several water-colour drawings by Rev. Thomas Fyles, a member of the Montreal branch of the Entomological Society of Ontario. He painted this larva and moth in 1901. “It represents the typical depiction of the insect world at the time,” says Prof. Mark Sears. “How far have we come in 100 years.”

Insects. Bugs. Creepy-crawlies. Some people shudder when they see them, but others find these little creatures fascinating and recognize that understanding them is important to many industries in agriculture, food and environmental services.

If you are someone who shudders, don’t be put off by the fact that a new exhibit in the McLaughlin Library fills several display cases with facts, figures and depictions of bugs, butterflies and their close relatives.

“Insects! Insects! Figments of Canadian Entomology” features fascinating historical material drawn from the library’s archives and assembled by statistics professor Gary Umphrey and retired environmental sciences professor Mark Sears.

Professionally, Umphrey is a numbers guy, but he has a passionate interest in the study of insects and the history of entomology. He says the entomological material in the archives dates back more than 150 years, to the date in 1863 when the first Entomological Society of Canada was founded. Yes, that’s four years before Confederation.

The society was renamed the Entomological Society of Ontario (ESO) in 1871 following a pledge of support from the Ontario government. But even after the name change, Umphrey says it still operated in many ways as a national organization with branches in other provinces. The first headquarters were in Toronto, but the organization soon moved to London and eventually Guelph in 1906, where it became affiliated with the Ontario Agricultural College (OAC). Today, the group’s library and archives are housed in the University of Guelph Library.

In 1950 the Entomological Society of Canada was formed, and ESO became a provincial organization. The two societies will celebrate their 150-year shared history of insect science at a four-day gala conference in Guelph Oct. 20 to 23. The library exhibit honours this occasion, providing a glimpse into the history of the study of insects in Canada for both conference-goers and the Guelph community.

The task of arranging 150 years of Canadian entomological history into displays is, not surprisingly, a bit daunting, says Umphrey. He appreciates the help of library archives staff Michelle Goodridge, Melissa McAfee and Kathryn Harvey, who have arranged and organized the displays. “Mark and I would like to have everything possible crammed into the displays, but the archivists help us sort things out and arrange them,” says Umphrey. “We know we can’t really get everything in, but we’d like to.”

The collection includes what Umphrey describes as “some very old, very cool volumes” such as books by Carl Linnaeus, who is known for developing the system used for naming plants and animals. A number of photos are in the collection, including one taken at the ESO’s 50thanniversary in 1913. The event was held at OAC, and one of the people in the photo is George Creelman, who was president of OAC at the time.

A former ESO president, Sears says that in the early 1900s the society gathered books and materials and traded journals and publications with other societies. “This was really cutting-edge at the time – the scientific descriptions and careful illustrations of the insects.”

Part of the library exhibit shows how these illustrations have evolved over time. It begins with drawings of insects, some hand-coloured, and continues the evolution through etchings and wood-cuts, pen-and-ink drawings, early photography and more advanced photographic techniques. A recent development, says Sears, is a photo taken with an electron microscope: “You get an image magnified thousands of times and can see the tiniest feature of the insect in great detail.”

Another display of how insects help people is also a reminder of U of G’s connection with the world of insects. Honeybees are naturally highlighted in this particular section, and Sears points out that bees have been part of the campus since the 1890s. At one time, in fact, OAC had an apiculture building located where the University Centre now stands.

Sears adds that new technology provides novel ways to bring alive the history of entomology in Canada; this year, the group is preparing a digital scrapbook. “We want to leave something for the future,” he says. It’s evidence that the importance of understanding insects and their role in agriculture and the environment continues.

(This interesting article has been taken from the following  link  of ‘at Guelph’ which is sent to me for further dissemination:

http://atguelph.uoguelph.ca/2013/10/library-exhibit-honours-canadian-entomology/)

Agriculture Sector Programme Support of DANIDA in Bangladesh(Based on the Website of Denmark in Bangladesh)

DANIDA is the term used for Denmark’s development cooperation, which is an area of activity under the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark.

Denmark’s development policy aims to contribute to reducing global poverty and helping people to take charge of their own destinies. This is the overriding objective for which DANIDA works.

DANIDA has responsibility for the planning, implementation and quality assurance of development cooperation. There are local and posted staff at Danish embassies and missions abroad, who are responsible for the administration and management of development cooperation with the individual country

 

 

 

DANIDA facts

  • Denmark grants an annual approximately DKK 15 billion in development assistance.
  • Denmark is one of five countries in the world to live up to the UN’s recommendation to grant a minimum of 0.7 per cent GNI in development assistance.
  • Denmark has been granting development assistance since the end of the Second World War.

Agriculture Sector Programme Support

(This content is taken from the following link for further dissemination of the support and  activities of DANIDA in Agriculture Sector of Bangladesh:http://bangladesh.um.dk/en/danida-en/agriculture-sector-programme-support/)

 

The agricultural sector plays a very significant role in the Bangladesh economy, socially as well as culturally. The Sixth Fiver Plan emphasizes the role of agriculture in generating employment, alleviating poverty and fostering growth


Agriculture’s main role in poverty reduction lies in maintaining the supply of food at least at a rate at which the demand has been growing, thereby keeping the food prices stable and within affordable limits of low-income households. The impact of agricultural growth on rural wages is an important element in the process since a major share of income of the poor originates from wage labour in agricultural and related activities. A high agricultural growth creates opportunities for diversification of the rural economy and development of the rural non-farm sector with greater poverty-reduction impact.

Denmark and Bangladesh have a long history of bilateral cooperation in agriculture, fishery and livestock. Denmark’s strategy to support the agricultural sector in Bangladesh includes a strong poverty reduction focus, together with special emphasis on poorer women, nutrition, marketing and environment. Support is provided to technology generation and delivery of essential services nearer to the farmers’ door steps.

Denmark’s support to agricultural development in Bangladesh has consistently been channelled through the Government of Bangladesh. This approach has been advantageous since these interventions have been well anchored at national level and have significant impact on present policies and strategies. Denmark also aims at harmonising its development assistance with other donor funded programmes in the same sector and geographical areas.

The Danish support to the agriculture sector started in late 80s and in 90s with Mymensingh Aquacultural Extension Project (1989), Smallholder Livestock Development Project (1992), Integrated Soil Fertility and Fertilizer Management Project (1993), Integrated Pest Management Project (1997), Patuakhali Barguna Aquacultural Extension Project (1997), Participatory Livestock Development Project (1998), Greater Noakhali Aquacultural extension Project (1998). The support has been continuing through Agriculture Sector Programme Support Phase I (2000-2006 ) and Agriculture Sector Programme Support Phase II (2006-2012).

Denmark has pledged to support a new “Agricultural Growth and Employment Programme” (AGEP) from 2013 to 2017. The Agricultural Growth and Employment Programme will be in line with the priorities of the Government of Bangladesh as set out in the Country Investment Plan (CIP) and the Sixth Five Year Plan. In line with CIP and the Sixth Five Year Plan, Agricultural Growth and Employment Programme will focus, among others, on:

  • Integration of crops, fishery and livestock extension
  • Diversification of agricultural production with special focus on high value crops
  • Formation of producer/marketing groups at village level
  • Agro Business Development

AGEP will have two components, namely Integrated Farm Management Component (IFMC) and Agro Business Development Component (ABDC). The Integrated Farm Management Component (IFMC) will be implemented by the Department of Agricultural Extension under the Ministry of Agriculture.

IFMC will promote the concept of Integrated Farm Management through Farmers’ Field School.

The Agro Business Development Component will support the third phase of the multi donor (SDC, DFID and the Netherlands) basket fund Katalyst.

 

(The article has been prepared and published on the basis of the website of Denmark in Bangladesh :http://bangladesh.um.dk/en/ for further dissemination of the information of support and activities of Denmark and DANIDA.)

 

Television Talkshow

With the advent of cable television technologies,a large number of television channels are now available for the viewers in most of the countries.The talkshow has emerged as a major television program in the present time.You can get a number of talkshows at any time of the day when you surf through the channels to select a program.
The diversity of talkshows presented in television is amazing.You can get talkshows on politics,language,literature,health,nutrition,share market,cooking,games,music,drama,movies,computer,internet,agriculture and many others.The choice and taste of an audience which talkshow she or he will enjoy.
Some cooking talkshows are very popular amomg the women,while share market investors are keen to attend the talkshows related to share market.
The topics of talkshows are determined by the issues of national or world interests.Any international event like game,war,disaster etc.will influence talkshows in most countries.National events also influence many talkshows.
The talkshows offer the audiences various information of their interests.The talkshows are instrumental in making the hosts and guests of the talkshows as famous personality.
The talkshows are great resources for the ever increasing television channels and also for the peoples of all countries.

Bangladesh celebrates the National Agriculturists' Day on the 13th February,2012

Bangladesh is an agricultural economy.Agriculture supports its major income,employment and vital activities.Agriculturists who are graduates from agricultural universities or faculties play major role in the development of Bangladesh.The national association of agricultural graduates,Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh has organized various activities to review the achievements of the agricultural graduates and strengthen the contributions of the graduates for the development of Bangladesh.All agricultural agencies of Bangladesh are observing this day and taking vow for development Bangladesh.Graduates working in various government and non -government agencies,universities and private sectors are taking part in the festivites of the day.
The agricultural sector of Bangladesh is composed of crops,livestock,fisheries and forestry.Ministries of Agriculture,Livestock,Fisheries and Forestry of the government administration are mainly manned by the agricultural graduates.Besides,many banks,specialised agencies and NGOs hire Agricultural graduates for their programmes.
The website of Krishibid Institution,Bangladesh is http://kib.org.bd/.It reflects the activities of the agriculturist community of Bangladesh.You are invited to visit the website and see the achievements of the Agriculturists working in various organizations of Bangladesh.